Trustees

Chair, Cathy James OBE

Cathy is a qualified solicitor and the former Chief Executive of the Whistleblowing charity Protect, where she still works as a legal consultant. Through this work Cathy has advised thousands of whistleblowers, as well as organisations, governments and regulators on whistleblowing systems in the UK and internationally. She has expertise in governance and risk management across all sectors. Cathy set up the independent Whistleblowing Commission, which made recommendations for improving the legal framework for whistleblowing in the UK, including a Code of Practice for employers. Before working at Protect, she was a litigation partner in a large London law firm. Cathy was awarded an OBE for services to employment rights in June 2015.


Richard Monkhouse

Richard Monkhouse

Richard is a Statistician and former Chair of the Magistrates’ Association. Richard is currently a trained Restorative Justice facilitator and Witness Support Volunteer for Manchester Crown Court. He has previously worked with the Restorative Justice Council to increase magistrates’ knowledge about the Restorative Justice process. Professionally, Richard has helped industry to improve quality and resource utilisation by using statistical methods such as Statistical Process Control. Richard joined Why me? in April 2016 and was nominated Chair in December 2016.


Janet Fleming Janet Fleming

Janet has extensive experience in third sector management and governance. Previously with National Council for Voluntary Organisations and a founder and supporter of Skills Third Sector, she joined the Board in November 2011. She is a member of the fundraising sub-committee.

 


Matthew Pink

Matthew initially trained as a probation officer, then moved to work as a Senior Practitioner in the Youth Offending Service. He currently manages the Restorative Justice Team in Cambridgeshire Youth Offending Service, and has experience as a trainer and practitioner in Restorative Justice work in the Criminal Justice System and the workplace.


Will Jacks

Will is the Research and Strategy Development Manager at the Henry Smith charity. He joined the Why Me? board in June 2017. He started his career in the criminal justice sector and has worked in a prison as well as with police tackling online hate crime; he has authored several research papers on this. Since 2013, Will has worked for The Henry Smith Charity, a large grant making trust where he is responsible for research and strategy development. He brings an understanding of the charity sector and experience working on both sides of the funder/grantee relationship.


Dr Belinda Hopkins

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Belinda has been pioneering restorative approaches in youth settings across the UK and beyond, for over 20 years. In the mid 90’s she founded Transforming Conflict, the first organisation in the UK to offer training and consultancy in restorative approaches. She later sat on the working group at the Home Office which developed national guidelines for restorative practice.

Belinda gained her doctorate in 2006 with research into the implementation of a whole school restorative approach. She is passionate about sharing how the ethos, principles and practices of Restorative Approaches can transform communities and institutions.

Belinda has also been on the European Forum for Restorative Justice Values and Principles Working Party, and is currently on their Training Committee – developing standardized training packages for use by all European countries.


Lucy Knell-Taylor

Lucy is a Youth Worker by training and has worked with young people in statutory and community settings for more than a decade. Currently the Practice Development Lead at Redthread (London, UK) Lucy has a wealth of front-line and managerial experience including crisis intervention and complex multi-agency safeguarding. Having previously worked in custodial, criminal justice and social care settings, the health sector presented a unique challenge – which Lucy and her teams relish.

Lucy’s practice is guided by an understanding that this work is extremely nuanced; human beings exist within inter-sectional, contextual and relational systems and have often had difficult experiences of the services set up to provide support resulting in a paucity of trust.  Untangling these experiences and identities takes patience, skill and tenacity. A passionate advocate of trauma-informed pathways, Lucy is ambitious about healing for all.


Brian Neale

Brian worked for the police in a career that spanned thirty years and involved a multitude of wide and varied roles. On behalf of the Government Office for the North East and the Home Office, Brian  worked in community safety management, project development and project delivery across a range of crime reduction and community safety subjects, often working in partnering arrangements with the public, private and voluntary sectors.

Brian is a long standing champion of Restorative Justice and during his career influenced local partners to invest in Restorative Justice, which ultimately led to its introduction across criminal justice organisations, recovery services, and local authorities. After working regionally and nationally as an advisor, accredited practitioner and trainer, he was given the opportunity to build Restorative Justice services across the Tees Valley. This resulted in the creation of a multi – agency team working across all facets of Restorative Justice, most notably in the area of serious and complex cases in the probation and prison environments.

Prior to his ‘retirement’ Brian led the local service in achieving the Restorative Justice Councils quality mark – RSQM. To date Brian’s involvement with Restorative Justice continues, working with partners to explore Restorative Justice ideas with young people and latterly military veterans.


Kate Aldous

Kate has been a senior manager in the voluntary sector for 20 years. Most of her experience has been in infrastructure organisations, including 12 years in the UK’s criminal justice infrastructure organisation and 10 years in other infrastructure settings. Kate began her career in an environmental mediation charity, and was also a volunteer for a neighbourhood mediation charity for over 4 years. Kate believes that the voluntary sector is uniquely placed to empower communities to improve social justice. 


Victor Azubuike

Victor is an Analyst at J.P. Morgan Chase working in the Securities Services Sales division.  He has also dedicated his time to supporting philanthropic causes including mental health, improving educational attainment of children from working class backgrounds and youth justice.

In his final year of university, he partnered with DebateMate, and taught an after-school debating club in a Birmingham inner-city primary school. As a result of this experience, he co-founded  My Brothers Keepers’ Bookclub. A series of book clubs with the aim of turning boys from low socioeconomic backgrounds into the most active readership group in the U.K.

He is also passionate about reforming the youth justice system and expanding the conversation about mental health to young people. In April 2018, Victor travelled as part of the British delegation to Strasbourg to report to the Council of Europe on the state of Children’s Mental Health and Child-Friendly Justice. He hopes to continue to contribute to these issues in the future.

© 2020 Why me? Charity no. 1137123. Company no. 6992709.

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